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7 Ways Your NonProfit Can Make the Most of Holiday Giving

10 Dec

This article originally appears here on the Software Advice blog:  Bringing in 2012: How Your Nonprofit Can Capture December’s Giving Trend | by Ashley Halligan,  Software Advice.

‘Tis the season for end-of-the-year holiday giving!  Ring in 2013 with a bang (and more donations!) with these helpful tips for your nonprofit’s fundraising.

Bringing in 2012: How Your Nonprofit Can Capture December’s Giving Trend

by Property Management Analyst, Software Advice
December 06, 2012

The holidays are upon us, and nonprofit organizations are scrambling to capture a share of holiday generosity. Statistics show that December represents a third of all online giving. And 22 percent of year-round donations accumulate in the last two days of the month.

December Giving Trends

Data supplied by Network for Good’s Online Giving Study.

Additionally, December donors tend to give more than supporters in other months. In fact, Network for Good’s Online Giving Study shows they donate 52 percent more. The study also says,

“December is the strongest month for most organizations offline. It’s even more so online. Further, it’s not just the month of December that’s spectacular, it’s the last couple of days, and even last few hours that make the difference.”

Americans want to donate to charitable causes during this time of year. In a survey conducted by The American Red Cross, 80 percent of Americans surveyed said helping those who are less fortunate is an important part of their holiday tradition. And 70 percent who donated in the last holiday season said they planned to donate the same or more in the upcoming season.

Given this compelling fundraising opportunity, what should nonprofits do to capitalize on the last-minute, year-end giving trend? Here are some suggestions from authors around the Web for organizations vying for a piece of the seasonal pie.

Make Giving Easy

Prospective donors shouldn’t have to search for a donation page. Frogloop writer Allyson Kapin suggests a big, bold, clear call-to-donate button. “This should be incredibly obvious in your navigation and in a callout box towards the top of your website. If you want to raise money, the donate button should not be buried and de-emphasized on your website.”

Keep it Seasonal

Jen Johnson, who writes for Otis Spunkmeyer’s Fundraising Success Tastes Sweet blog, says that including festive elements “adds excitement, spirit and holiday magic to the hard, cold process of raising money.” She suggests seasonal fundraising efforts like wreath auctions, themed charity walks/runs, holiday bake sales, caroling events, and Christmas concerts.

CLICK HERE to read the whole article, and all 7 tips for end-of-year nonprofit fundraising!

Amy Neumann’s (@CharityIdeas) NEW book, “Uplifting Quotes on Gratitude…” #Gratitude #Quotes

5 Sep

Yay!

“Amy Neumann’s new book, “Uplifting Quotes on Gratitude and Goodness to Show Appreciation” is here!” 

My new book, “Uplifting Quotes on Gratitude and Goodness to Show Appreciation” is here! 150+ of my personal favorite quotes on gratitude, kindness, and social good.

At last!  I am so excited to share 150+ of my favorite quotes to inspire and show gratitude.  My new book is here!  On paperback, or eBook version.  Makes a great little “Thank You!” 😀

More details here!

Whether you’re a business or nonprofit professional, or simply like to feel inspired and share your positive outlook with others, this handy book provides quotes to help show your gratitude, compassion, and bright view of the world.  

To follow up after a great client meeting, interview, or event, or as an anytime thank you to colleagues, donors, customers, family, or friends, this book has the perfect inspiring quote for the occasion.

This book is a lot like life:  open it up anywhere, and be amazed at the serendipity!

Thank YOU so much for being you!

Uplifting Quotes on Gratitude and Goodness to Show Appreciation By Amy Neumann

Paperback: $8.88
Ships in 3-5 business days
Whether you’re a business or nonprofit professional, or simply like to feel inspired and share your positive outlook with others, this handy book provides quotes to help show your gratitude,… More >
Uplifting Quotes on Gratitude and Goodness to Show Appreciation – Downloadable By Amy Neumann

eBook (ePub): $1.88
Download immediately.
Whether you’re a business or nonprofit professional, or simply like to feel inspired and share your positive outlook with others, this handy book provides quotes to help show your gratitude,… More >
© 2012 Amy Neumann, Good Plus Tech LLC.
This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution – CC 3.0
ISBN:   978-1-300-16079-3

Together We Can End Bullying | by @2morrowknight @AnnTran_ @CharityIdeas | #endbullying

30 Mar
This article originally appears in The Huffington Post.

Together We Can End Bullying

Posted: 03/29/2012 6:44 pm

“Safety and security don’t just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear.”– Nelson Mandela

Bullying has become a huge issue these days, both online and off. Not just for individuals, but also for families and communities. It’s a mentally, emotionally trying experience. With the release of the movie, Bully in theaters March 30, the spotlight is shining even brighter on the tragic consequences bullying can have.

The good news is, there are ways to find, prevent, and remove bullying from classrooms and computers (and workplaces and life). Many organizations, celebrities, and passionate people are focused on the issue. Lady Gaga recently launched her Born This Way Foundation, Ellen DeGeneres has been an outspoken advocate to #endbullying, supporting organizations like GLSEN, The Trevor Project, and The National Center for Bullying Prevention, and what once seemed like “someone else’s problem” is becoming much more visible to us all. And along with more mainstream visibility comes more compassion, as well as more solutions. Part of solving any problem is education.

Here are some alarming figures from anti-bullying nonprofit Community Matters:

  • 25,000 students are targets of attacks, shakedowns, robberies in secondary schools every day (National School Safety Center)
  • 46% of high school students report seeing a serious fight at least once a month at school (USA Today). Research shows that 1/3 of the brain shuts down for as much as 72 hours after seeing that type of violence
  • 260 teachers are physically assaulted and 6250 teachers are threatened with bodily injury every day (National Education Association)
  • Approximately 75% of students say they have been bullied at school (Centers for Disease Control & Prevention)
  • Every day, 160,000 students stay home from school due to fear of attack or intimidation (National Association of School Psychologists)

Photo by Jose Kevo (Flickr).

Although these statistics seem intimidating, concrete steps can be taken to protect your child. The first step is awareness. CNN has an article, “How to Spot a Bullied Child and What to Do,” that highlights a few signs you may see from a bullied child:

  • Inexplicable fits of rage: Does your child blow up at the least provocation?
  • Overreaction to normal, daily frustrations: Does your child overreact to people and situations that never would have bothered him or her before?
  • Faking illness to avoid going to school, or even making themselves sick.
  • Impaired immune system and frequent illness: The constant stress and sadness associated with severe bullying can weaken your child’s immune system. This, coupled with a child’s wishing he or she were sick to get out of school can be a powerful combination.

2012-03-27-BullyFreeZoneEddieSFlickr.jpg
Image courtesy of Eddie-S (Flickr).

Here are a few things The National Bullying Prevention Center suggests you can do to help prevent bullying:

  • Sign a Petition–Unite with others and add your voice to an online petition or hold a petition signing event at your school or in your community.
  • Share Stories–Upload a video, story, poem, artwork, or audio clip expressing how you feel about bullying, how you think it affects students and schools, what you have done to prevent bullying, or what others can do to prevent bullying.
  • National Bullying Prevention Month–Participate in activities, education and awareness building in October.
  • Community Events–Hold a special event to show your school or organization cares about this important issue. The event can include music, giveaways, special speakers, petition signings and more, as people unite to join the movement against bullying.
  • Run, Walk, Roll Against Bullying–Raise awareness of bullying prevention in your community with a live event. Find a location, gather sponsors, invite participants and hold the event. Consider planning activities for after the race, such as speakers, drawings and more.
  • Donate–Donating to the cause is a great way to share you care. Your contribution can mean one less student being bullied, one more student speaking out, or one more student knowing that someone cares.

And don’t forget to share your passion to help with your social networks. With more understanding and awareness of the problem, the chances of creating long-term change greatly increase. Like most things, the more we work together to listen, learn, and help, the faster things will get better. Because everyone deserves to feel and be safe and happy.

Follow Amy Neumann on Twitter: www.twitter.com/CharityIdeas

An Amazing All-In-One #NPTECH Resource Page from @SocialBrite

16 Mar

This is an incredible set of resources from the one and only SocialBrite.org – one of my personal favorite sites for all things social media, nonprofit, and technology.  Thanks Team SocialBrite!

Visit them often!

Sharing Center

A free learning hub for nonprofits & change-makers:
Power guides, tools, tutorials, reports, resources & more

2nd Life

Power guides

Twitter icon by Matt Know

Twitter Guide

Facebook

Facebook

metrics

Metrics

social media policies

Social media policies

Video: Open Media Foundation

Video & media

  • Creating media: resources, tutorials on effective use of video, multimedia, audio, podcasting & more.
  • Strategy: Step-by-step guide to creating a media strategy.
  • Video skills: Guide to shooting better online video.
  • Video guide: Elements of a video project

mobile

Mobile

Gov 2.0

Cause organizations

  • A deep, timely directory of cause organizations making a difference in the social change & nonprofit worlds, with reviews

All of these guides, directories and tutorials live on the Socialbrite site except where noted. Please contribute your own resource listings! We share everything here under Creative Commons licenses.

Credits

Image credits for the rotating slide show for the Sharing Center navigation of Socialbrite.org (all photos are Creative Commons Attribution):

Only Hope by royryap
Andy at the Getty by Kevin Dooley
torraera (camels) by bachmont
Beautiful old lady from Darap (Sikkim) village by Sukanto Debnath
Muchilottu Bhagavathy Theyyam ceremonial mask by freebird (bobinson)
Blue (underwater statue) by John Carleton
One gear in a Clock by G & M
Untitled (flower) by josef.stuefer

Image credits for the rotating slide show for the Resources navigation of Socialmedia.biz (all photos are Creative Commons Attribution):

The oyster in the shell by on1stsite(comp broken and in need of eyesurgery)
Light Painting by Steve Jurvetson
look downstairs into stairwell whirl by quapan
Sarah Austin by JD Lasica
Time by John Morgan
Q-Park by Wolfgang Staudt

On this page:
Power guides image by Cambodia4kids; Monitoring photo by CaronNYC; Partners photo by Jemingway

With huge thanks to Click on the SocialBrite logo for the original page!

You can follow Team SocialBrite here:

And to get the latest and greatest updates in real time, here are several fantastic #nptech experts on Twitter SocialBrite recommends (and I do too!)

Twitter bird
Tweet-roll

@kanter
@WiserEarth
@care2frogloop
@ClaireD
@amanda
@pistachio
@cfnoble
@sloane
@amyrsward
@Philanthropy
@CauseGlobal
@fdncenter
@idealist
@TakePart
@scottyhendo
@Public_Citizen
@HandsOnNetwork

Share the Joy: 12 Days of Giving – #12DaysOfGiving

12 Dec

This also appears on the Huffington Post.

“One person can make a difference, and every person should try.” ~ John F. Kennedy

‘Tis better to give than receive, as the old adage goes. And at no time of year do we feel this more keenly than the holidays! The spirit of giving is everywhere. People are a little kinder, a little more generous, and a little more willing to help a stranger.

All of these things led to the #12DaysofGiving, a 12-day bonanza of giving, sharing, and promoting social good from 12/13 to 12/24. Each day, amazing people and charities will be highlighted, with the goal to raise over $12,000 for the causes, as well to enlist the help of millions of passionate social media users globally to help spread awareness. The goal is not only to show support for these causes, but also to illustrate the power of social media for social good and the massive impact thousands of small, meaningful actions can help when used collectively.

2011-12-12-12DaysDatemedium.jpg


12 Outstanding Charities.
12 Inspiring Influencers.
12 Days of Giving…
One Amazing Project

How can you help? First, please share this on Facebook, Twitter, Linked In, your Blog, and email. And if you can, please make a small (or huge!) donation on Crowdrise to any or all of the diverse group of incredible charities here.
You can follow @12DaysGiving, and learn more on the 12 Days of Giving site, GivingKicksAss.com or on Crowdrise.

Happy giving!

39 Inspiring Men and Their Passion for Charity

5 Dec

This piece originally appeared in the Huffington Post: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2morrowknight/38-inspiring-men-and-thei_b_956168.html

39 Inspiring Men and Their Passion for Charity

Posted: 09/16/11 04:50 PM ET

  Charity ,   Inspiration ,   Twitter , Feel Good Stories , Giving , Nonprofits , Passion , Slidepollajax , Social Good , Impact News

This is the latest post in our series, TwitterPowerhouses, which focuses on the contributions of people who’ve helped to expand, influence, and redefine how we view social networking.

A life of kindness and gratitude is tremendously powerful. And when applied to the charitable efforts making the world a better place, the results are often extraordinary. From across diverse backgrounds and all ends of the globe, these gentlemen exemplify a global view of sharing and helping others in their daily lives, and through the amazing networked nonprofits they support. They all embody the spirit of Booker T. Washington’s famous words: “If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else.”

Reluctant to talk about themselves, they deftly shift conversations from themselves to other people, or to one of their many projects. They are dreamers and visionaries. They like to imagine vibrant communities bursting with culture — music, art, history, theater, film — and full of people realizing their potential. But they’re not only dreamers, they want people to be a part of their dreams.

Claire Diaz-Ortiz, leader of Social Innovation at Twitter Inc., and author of the book Twitter for Good, is brilliant in the international community of philanthropy and is someone all three writers on this post respect. Her ideas, and Twitter, have led countless people toward social good. The Networked Nonprofits we support – 2morrowknight with SeeYourImpact, Amy with United Way, and Yasamin with The 1010Project – are impacted by her work. And by Twitter. As are all of the men highlighted here. In fact, if it weren’t for Twitter, we may not have had the honor of talking with all of them and sharing their insights.

In a world that will soon have 7 billion people, these men understand how important it is to engage non-profits that help raise our standard of living, expand our worldview, and give us hope for the future. Indeed, together, we thrive!

Authors’ Note: In case you missed it, here’s Part 20 of the series: The Social Media Vision of Jessica Northey.

Click here for the original article SlideShow!

Social Good Stars – Beth Kanter (@kanter)

19 Nov

This post originally appears in the Huffington Post in my new series for Impact, “Social Good Stars.”  Thank you to the amazing Beth Kanter!

Writer, speaker and social media consultant for nonprofits and businesses
Follow Amy Neumann on Twitter: www.twitter.com/CharityIdeas

Social Good Stars: Beth Kanter

Posted: 11/18/11 12:43 PM ET

This is the first in a new Impact series, #SocialGoodStars. The people highlighted here are passionate, dedicated philanthropists, strengths to their communities, and social media masters. They also happily share their vast knowledge with others, making them shine as leaders in the Social Good world.

There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle, or the mirror that reflects it. ~Edith Wharton

Some people stand out as an example of a person who is indeed the bright candle, from whom others can help spread light. Beth Kanter, well-known in nonprofit and social media circles alike, is one of those people. She has been named by Fast Company Magazine as one of the most influential women in technology and one of Business Week’s “Voices of Innovation for Social Media.” She is the author of Beth’s Blog: How Nonprofits Can Use Social Media, one of the longest running and most popular blogs for nonprofits, and the book, “The Networked Nonprofit” with Allison Fine. She is also co-founder of Zoetica Media. Most importantly, Beth spends a lot of time listening to others, curating key information, and sharing it so other people can also be Social Good Stars.

2011-11-15-Bethkanter.jpg

Beth Kanter in Kenya with a winner of her book.

With 32 years in nonprofit social good, Beth is the perfect person to answer some pressing questions about current and future trends. Our interview is below.

You famously co- authored the book, “The Networked Nonprofit” with Allison Fine, and have worked with social good luminaries such as Claire Diaz-Ortiz of Twitter and Randi Zuckerberg of Facebook.  With such legendary background knowledge, can you reveal any social-media-for-social-good trends you see?

What’s top of mind at this moment is this stat:  In 2020, 40% of the world population will have grown up knowing nothing but the Internet and social networks.  Think about that. I’m a baby boomer and my first job was with the Boston Symphony in late 70’s, early 80’s.  I was in development and wanted to see examples of membership or annual fund brochures from other symphonies.  So, I wrote letters to about 20 of them, asking for a copy.  It took a month, but I then had a great collection of ideas — which was good because the annual conference when we could exchange that sort of stuff was six months away.  Now, we can learn in real time from our peers. Think how fast ideas are shared and copied from nonprofit to nonprofit.  I also watched my son last night do his homework.  He is 12.  He had to do a PowerPoint on Portugal.   He had a PowerPoint document uploaded into Google, was collaborating on it with two friends, and they were talking to each other on Skype. Our world is changing before our eyes and organizations really need to think about what this means for their work.  I think about the younger people in nonprofits — and those like free agents outside, and how important it is for nonprofit leaders to empower younger, millenials on staff and outside their walls.

Who is a personal  hero/ine in the social good space?  What makes them unique?

This is such a hard question — I have so many heroes/heroines.  But, I will name one.  Kristin Row-Finkbeiner the co-founder of Momsrising. “Where Moms and people who love them go to change our world.” They are such a fantastic example of working in this agile and transparent way and leveraging social media for on the ground social change.

 How important is “networking” to you in social media (and IRL)?  Has social media made it faster, slower, more or less relevant?

Definitely faster. I’ve always been a networker, before the tools — that is seeking people out, introducing people, and learning from the network/community.  The challenge when you add online tools is that you can connect to so many more people that you run the risk of having shallow relationships.  I have a lot of connections or friends, and I often feel that I don’t get a chance to just to chat and get to know people in a deeper way. These days I get a lot of requests for a lot of things. I find that introducing people to other people where there is a mutual need or potential for reciprocity is a good thing.

 What’s the “killer app” of social media right now?

Tools come and ago — and they change faster than humans.  Right now the killer app or type of app is content curation.  Less about the tools, more about the process.  I’m really excited about the whole concept of people whose job it is to make sense of information on the web. They used to be called journalists — but we have so much information available to us now that the sorting and making sense of it is a job in and of itself. This primer on content curation talks about why.

Do you have a favorite “social media success story” for this this year?

Yes, grist.org. They use a unique combination of entertaining content and environmental reporting, dubbed the “The Daily Show of the environmental movement.”  They have inspired a whole new generation of environmentalists who don’t take themselves so seriously while creating on-the-ground change.

What personal projects and charities do you love & support?

My main charity is the Sharing Foundation which helps kids in Cambodia.  My two kids were adopted from that country – and supporting the organizations is a way to give back.

I’m also on the board of Ushahidi , a non-profit tech company that develops free and open source software for information collection, visualization and interactive mapping. I support a number of other organizations in small ways.

2011-11-15-bethhat.jpg

Beth Kanter

You can learn more about Beth at BethKanter.org and follow her on Twitter @kanter.

Amy Neumann is a writer, speaker and consultant on social good marketing. Check out her CharityIdeasBlog and follow her on Twitter @CharityIdeas.


Social Media for Social Good

24 Oct

Thank you to Arizona State University for having me as a featured workshop presenter at your 19th annual Sustainability Conference!  Held at ASU Lodestar’s Dessert Willow Conference Center in Phoenix, Arizona, October 14, 2011, it featured some of the most brilliant minds on Collective Impact.  This year’s theme was “‘Go fast, go alone; go far, go together’: Collective Impact.”  Nearly 250 nonprofit leaders, community partners, students and professionals from across all sectors – business, government, general public, and nonprofit participated.

In the 90-minute Workshop, we covered a multitude of reasons why social media works so well for social good, and got many brilliant questions.  Although we can’t recreate the full session, the entire Keynote presentation can be downloaded for free  HERE.

[And I’m always reachable on amy@amyneumann.com. ]

Warren Buffett himself has quoted the wise ancient Chinese proverb — “To go fast, go alone; to go far, go together.” And it’s eloquently perfect for social media.

To put it another equally eloquent way, when thinking of social media:

“Luck is quite predictable.  If you want more luck, take more chances.  Be more active.  Show up more often.” ~ Brian Tracy

Essentially, that’s what social media is.  Conversations between people interested in the same things, in places convenient to them, when it’s handy.  If you’re in all the right places, at all the right times, with all the right messages, everyone will happily work together, almost instinctually.  That’s the message.  And that’s what I believe is the theme of social media, for Collective Impact, and for Social Good.

Why I Love QR Codes – Amy Neumann

2 Oct

Scan Amy Neumann's QR code for more!

Simply put, I love QR Codes because they make getting key information directly into someone’s hands easier and faster.

QR Codes, short for “Quick Response”, are these funky boxes (left) that when scanned link to more information online. [ I like using @daqri because of the number and types of links you can embed behind it.  It’s in private beta, and here’s their site, where you can request an invite:  daqri.com.]

This one shown is my personal QR Code, which I have on my business cards, sites, blogs, and pretty much everywhere.  If you download the free daqri app you can see the 8 links behind it (which can include PDFs, sites, maps, video, link to call directly, and more.)

These are brilliant to use for nonprofit events, where you can add directions and maps, info like an auction catalog, a way to purchase tickets and make donations via mobile like give.mobi, links to sites, direct click-to-call, and more in one spot.  You can upload videos of prior events and post pictures and videos of the event real-time.

Here are a couple great examples of using QR Codes:

What are your thoughts on QR Codes?

Twitter’s Claire Diaz-Ortiz @ClaireD: HOW TO Use Twitter for Good!

26 Sep

Twitter’s Claire Diaz-Ortiz (@ClaireD): HOW TO Use Twitter for Good!

“How can *I* use Twitter for Good?”

As a consultant to nonprofits and business about social media strategy, Twitter is without a doubt what garners the most curiosity and questions.  Having heard countless uplifting tales of how it can help people in disasters, break fundraising records, and create global awareness, people everywhere want to know: 

What’s the secret to Twitter?

 “Be a Force for Good.”
                    ~ Twitter’s operating principle

Claire Diaz-Ortiz, aka @ClaireD, Twitter’s Philanthropy & Social Good Expert.

Luckily, the day has arrived that Twitter’s own philanthropy and social good leader, Claire Diaz-Ortiz (pictured), has written the book on just that: the definitive How-To guide, “Twitter for Good”.  From co-founding a nonprofit for AIDS orphans (Hope Runs) in Kenya and using Twitter there in 2007, to helping the world’s largest nonprofits and socially responsible companies, Claire has seen amazing uses of Twitter and shares some best practices in her book.

Claire became impressed with Twitter impact for good while using it in 2007 in Kenya, running her nonprofit Hope Runs.

Having been inspired by Claire’s discussion of her T.W.E.E.T. model as panelists together at Dell’s Social Innovation Competition earlier this year, I asked her how we can all “Be a Force for Good.”

  • What do you consider most important for organizations who want to use Twitter for Good effectively?

“First, developing a strategy is the answer to ‘What am I doing on Twitter?’  I create the 5-Step framework called T.W.E.E.T. to help with that and for using Twitter:  Target, Write, Engage, Explore, Track.  It works because it’s simple.”

  • What are a few examples of nonprofits really leveraging the relationships from Twitter to impact awareness and fundraising or other key goals?

Pepsi Refresh showed what it means to pique the interest of the Twitter audience, and draw them to a site to learn more and take action.  Pepsi took $20 million, and later included another $1.3 million for the Gulf, and used Twitter to help local causes be broadcast across the nation and beyond to win grants to help their communities by voting.

Mark Horvath, well-known as @hardlynormal on Twitter and founder of InvisiblePeople.tv, is another brilliant example.  He travels the US and Canada interviewing our homeless friends on video and gives them a voice, a voice everyone can now hear because of the reach of Twitter.”

  • Twitter does numerous internal philanthropy projects, including your pro-bono Tweets for Good program.  Can you talk about that?

“Within our advertising platform, we offer pro-bono programs for non-profits already engaged on Twitter.  Promoted Tweets are a tool advertisers use to promote specific campaigns via Tweets on Twitter. The Promoted Tweets for Good programs is an application-based pro-bono program serving a number of non-profit organizations each year. We offer a second type of Promoted Tweets for Good ad hoc to organizations involved in disaster relief in times of crisis or civil unrest.”

        “People are basically good…When you give them a simple tool that helps them exhibit that behavior, they will prove it to you every day.”
                ~ Biz Stone

For more information on Claire’s book, and many more ideas, below is an informative trailer for “Twitter for Good”, which highlights additional tips and case studies.  More about programs mentioned can also be found at http://Hope140.org and http://Twitter4Good.com

The Video Trailer for the “Twitter for Good” book

I received an advance copy of “Twitter for Good” and found it incredibly helpful for both nonprofits and business, and for individuals too. ~ Amy  [Follow me on Twitter @CharityIdeas]


Claire's book, "Twitter for Good"

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