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Social Media for Social Good

24 Oct

Thank you to Arizona State University for having me as a featured workshop presenter at your 19th annual Sustainability Conference!  Held at ASU Lodestar’s Dessert Willow Conference Center in Phoenix, Arizona, October 14, 2011, it featured some of the most brilliant minds on Collective Impact.  This year’s theme was “‘Go fast, go alone; go far, go together’: Collective Impact.”  Nearly 250 nonprofit leaders, community partners, students and professionals from across all sectors – business, government, general public, and nonprofit participated.

In the 90-minute Workshop, we covered a multitude of reasons why social media works so well for social good, and got many brilliant questions.  Although we can’t recreate the full session, the entire Keynote presentation can be downloaded for free  HERE.

[And I’m always reachable on amy@amyneumann.com. ]

Warren Buffett himself has quoted the wise ancient Chinese proverb — “To go fast, go alone; to go far, go together.” And it’s eloquently perfect for social media.

To put it another equally eloquent way, when thinking of social media:

“Luck is quite predictable.  If you want more luck, take more chances.  Be more active.  Show up more often.” ~ Brian Tracy

Essentially, that’s what social media is.  Conversations between people interested in the same things, in places convenient to them, when it’s handy.  If you’re in all the right places, at all the right times, with all the right messages, everyone will happily work together, almost instinctually.  That’s the message.  And that’s what I believe is the theme of social media, for Collective Impact, and for Social Good.

Why I Love QR Codes – Amy Neumann

2 Oct

Scan Amy Neumann's QR code for more!

Simply put, I love QR Codes because they make getting key information directly into someone’s hands easier and faster.

QR Codes, short for “Quick Response”, are these funky boxes (left) that when scanned link to more information online. [ I like using @daqri because of the number and types of links you can embed behind it.  It’s in private beta, and here’s their site, where you can request an invite:  daqri.com.]

This one shown is my personal QR Code, which I have on my business cards, sites, blogs, and pretty much everywhere.  If you download the free daqri app you can see the 8 links behind it (which can include PDFs, sites, maps, video, link to call directly, and more.)

These are brilliant to use for nonprofit events, where you can add directions and maps, info like an auction catalog, a way to purchase tickets and make donations via mobile like give.mobi, links to sites, direct click-to-call, and more in one spot.  You can upload videos of prior events and post pictures and videos of the event real-time.

Here are a couple great examples of using QR Codes:

What are your thoughts on QR Codes?

Twitter’s Claire Diaz-Ortiz @ClaireD: HOW TO Use Twitter for Good!

26 Sep

Twitter’s Claire Diaz-Ortiz (@ClaireD): HOW TO Use Twitter for Good!

“How can *I* use Twitter for Good?”

As a consultant to nonprofits and business about social media strategy, Twitter is without a doubt what garners the most curiosity and questions.  Having heard countless uplifting tales of how it can help people in disasters, break fundraising records, and create global awareness, people everywhere want to know: 

What’s the secret to Twitter?

 “Be a Force for Good.”
                    ~ Twitter’s operating principle

Claire Diaz-Ortiz, aka @ClaireD, Twitter’s Philanthropy & Social Good Expert.

Luckily, the day has arrived that Twitter’s own philanthropy and social good leader, Claire Diaz-Ortiz (pictured), has written the book on just that: the definitive How-To guide, “Twitter for Good”.  From co-founding a nonprofit for AIDS orphans (Hope Runs) in Kenya and using Twitter there in 2007, to helping the world’s largest nonprofits and socially responsible companies, Claire has seen amazing uses of Twitter and shares some best practices in her book.

Claire became impressed with Twitter impact for good while using it in 2007 in Kenya, running her nonprofit Hope Runs.

Having been inspired by Claire’s discussion of her T.W.E.E.T. model as panelists together at Dell’s Social Innovation Competition earlier this year, I asked her how we can all “Be a Force for Good.”

  • What do you consider most important for organizations who want to use Twitter for Good effectively?

“First, developing a strategy is the answer to ‘What am I doing on Twitter?’  I create the 5-Step framework called T.W.E.E.T. to help with that and for using Twitter:  Target, Write, Engage, Explore, Track.  It works because it’s simple.”

  • What are a few examples of nonprofits really leveraging the relationships from Twitter to impact awareness and fundraising or other key goals?

Pepsi Refresh showed what it means to pique the interest of the Twitter audience, and draw them to a site to learn more and take action.  Pepsi took $20 million, and later included another $1.3 million for the Gulf, and used Twitter to help local causes be broadcast across the nation and beyond to win grants to help their communities by voting.

Mark Horvath, well-known as @hardlynormal on Twitter and founder of InvisiblePeople.tv, is another brilliant example.  He travels the US and Canada interviewing our homeless friends on video and gives them a voice, a voice everyone can now hear because of the reach of Twitter.”

  • Twitter does numerous internal philanthropy projects, including your pro-bono Tweets for Good program.  Can you talk about that?

“Within our advertising platform, we offer pro-bono programs for non-profits already engaged on Twitter.  Promoted Tweets are a tool advertisers use to promote specific campaigns via Tweets on Twitter. The Promoted Tweets for Good programs is an application-based pro-bono program serving a number of non-profit organizations each year. We offer a second type of Promoted Tweets for Good ad hoc to organizations involved in disaster relief in times of crisis or civil unrest.”

        “People are basically good…When you give them a simple tool that helps them exhibit that behavior, they will prove it to you every day.”
                ~ Biz Stone

For more information on Claire’s book, and many more ideas, below is an informative trailer for “Twitter for Good”, which highlights additional tips and case studies.  More about programs mentioned can also be found at http://Hope140.org and http://Twitter4Good.com

The Video Trailer for the “Twitter for Good” book

I received an advance copy of “Twitter for Good” and found it incredibly helpful for both nonprofits and business, and for individuals too. ~ Amy  [Follow me on Twitter @CharityIdeas]


Claire's book, "Twitter for Good"

Ask 5 for 5 – Help Africa’s Famine! #Ask5for5

20 Sep

Guest Blogger: Sarah Lenssen from #Ask5for5
Family photos by Mike Fiechtner Photography

Thank you (insert blog name) and nearly 150 other bloggers from around the world for allowing me to share a story with you today, during Social Media Week.

A hungry child in East Africa can’t wait. Her hunger consumes her while we decide if we’ll respond and save her life. In Somalia, children are stumbling along for days, even weeks, on dangerous roads and with empty stomachs in search of food and water. Their crops failed for the third year in a row. All their animals died. They lost everything. Thousands are dying along the road before they find help in refugee camps. 

At my house, when my three children are hungry, they wait minutes for food, maybe an hour if dinner is approaching. Children affected by the food crisis in Ethiopia, Kenya, and Somalia aren’t so lucky. Did you know that the worst drought in 60 years is ravaging whole countries right now, as you read this? Famine, a term not used lightly, has been declared in Somalia. This is the world’s first famine in 20 years.12.4 million people are in need of emergency assistance and over 29,000 children have died in the last three months alone. A child is dying every 5 minutes. It it estimated that 750,000 people could die before this famine is over. Take a moment and let that settle in.

The media plays a major role in disasters. They have the power to draw the attention of society to respond–or not. Unfortunately, this horrific disaster has become merely a footnote in most national media outlets. News of the U.S. national debt squabble and the latest celebrity’s baby bump dominate headlines. That is why I am thrilled that nearly 150 bloggers from all over the world are joining together today to use the power of social media to make their own headlines; to share the urgent need of the almost forgotten with their blog readers. Humans have the capacity to care deeply for those who are suffering, but in a situation like this when the numbers are too huge to grasp and the people so far away, we often feel like the little we can do will be a drop in the ocean, and don’t do anything at all.

When news of the famine first hit the news in late July, I selfishly avoided it. I didn’t want to read about it or hear about it because I knew I would feel overwhelmed and uncomfortable. I wanted to protect myself. I knew I would need to do something if I knew what was really happening. You see, this food crisis is personal. I have a 4-year-old son and a 1 yr-old daughter who were adopted from Ethiopia and born in regions now affected by the drought. If my children still lived in their home villages, they would be two of the 12.4 million. My children: extremely hungry and malnourished? Gulp. I think any one of us would do anything we could for our hungry child. But would you do something for another mother’s hungry child?

My friend and World Vision staffer, Jon Warren, was recently in Dadaab Refugee Camp in Kenya–the largest refugee camp in the world with over 400,000 people. He told me the story of Isnino Siyat, 22, a mother who walked for 10 days and nights with her husband, 1 yr-old-baby, Suleiman, and 4 yr.-old son Adan Hussein, fleeing the drought in Somalia. When she arrived at Dadaab, she built the family a shelter with borrowed materials while carrying her baby on her back. Even her dress is borrowed. As she sat in the shelter on her second night in camp she told Jon, “I left because of hunger. It is a very horrible drought which finished both our livestock and our farm.” The family lost their 5 cows and 10 goats one by one over 3 months, as grazing lands dried up. “We don’t have enough food now…our food is finished. I am really worried about the future of my children and myself if the situation continues.”

Will you help a child like Baby Suleiman? Ask5for5 is a dream built upon the belief that you will.

That something I knew I would need to do became a campaign called #Ask5for5 to raise awareness and funds for famine and drought victims. The concept is simple, give $5 and ask five of your friends to give $5, and then they each ask five of their friends to give $5 and so on–in nine generations of 5x5x5…we could raise $2.4 Million! In one month, over 750 people have donated over $25,000! I set up a fundraiser at See Your Impact and 100% of the funds will go to World Vision, an organization that has been fighting hunger in the Horn of Africa for decades and will continue long after this famine has ended. Donations can multiply up to 5 times in impact by government grants to
help provide emergency food, clean water, agricultural support,
healthcare, and other vital assistance to children and families suffering in the Horn.

I need you to help me save lives. It’s so so simple; here’s what you need to do:

  1. Donate $5 or more on this page (http://seeyourimpact.org/members/ask5for5)
  2. Send an email to your friends and ask them to join us.
  3. Share #Ask5for5 on Facebook and Twitter!

I’m looking for another 100 bloggers to share this post on their blogs throughout Social Media Week. Email me at ask5for5@gmail.com if you’re interested in participating this week.

A hungry child doesn’t wait. She doesn’t wait for us to finish the other things on our to-do list, or get to it next month when we might have a little more money to give. She doesn’t wait for us to decide if she’s important enough to deserve a response. She will only wait as long as her weakened little body will hold on…please respond now and help save her life. Ask 5 for 5.

Thank you on behalf of all of those who will be helped–you are saving lives and changing history.

p.s. Please don’t move on to the next website before you donate and email your friends right now. It only takes 5 minutes and just $5, and if you’re life is busy like mine, you probably won’t get back to it later. Let’s not be a generation that ignores hundreds of thousands of starving people, instead let’s leave a legacy of compassion. You have the opportunity to save a life today!
 

Twitter IDs of People and Charities in 39 Inspiring Men

19 Sep

The Twitter IDs of the People and Charities in 39 Inspiring Men on Huffington Post – Follow them all!

@2morrowknight  @CharityIdeas  @ybeitollahi  @ClaireD  @kanter  @DrAndyBaldwin  @GotYourBackNet  @jeffrago  @NOH8campaign  @TheAntonioNeves  @Student_Mentor  @LAUnitedWay  @SeeYourImpact  @mayhemstudios  @the1010project   @live_united  @HuffingtonPost  @HuffPostImpact  @RayBeckerman  @Survival  @BullsAndBeavers   @SVAdaptiveSport  @zaibatsu  @GatesFoundation  @GWPStudio  @MummysWishInc   @AlexPriest  @88bikes  @jeffbullas  @FredHollows  @LXLEE  @josedramirez @Alyssa_Milano   @Unicef   @sdhumane  @KevinMinott  @jimgrayonline  @gofiliberto  @HomeboyInd  @ClementYeung  @KIVA  @TedNguyen  @gupshupblog  @Nisha360  @MartyMcPadden  @KidsAreHeroes  @randfish  @RickGriffin    @TheTop10Blog  @SaveTheChildren  @teeco71  @IS_Foundation  @iansomerhalder  @weirdchina  @WFP  @SavetheChildren  @ryanintheus  @TeamUp4NonProf  @StephenWelton  @MakeAWishCa  @MySODotCom  @ScottHarrison  @CharityWater  @kobyb  @arkarthick  @FeedingAmerica @Ahambhumika  @SteveAkinsSEO  @AmDiabetesAssn  @suthisak  @bitrebels  @Minervity  @CPCharity  @mqtodd  @goinggreentoday  @smaxbrown  @Love146  @ImadNaffa  @OperationSAFE  @Barryckr  @TheSchoolbag   @livestrong @lancearmstron @hardlynormal @kamichat @geoffliving @ChrisVoss @ASPCA @RobQuigley @AlexsLemonade

A Path from Pain to Positivity by @CharityIdeas – Huffington Post

13 Sep

This post originally appears in the Huffington Post:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/amy-neumann/a-path-from-pain-to-posit_b_958558.html

Amy Neumann

Writer, speaker and social media consultant for nonprofits and businesses

A Path from Pain to Positivity

Posted: 9/12/11 07:48 PM ET

Sometimes a path forms where you tread most without you even realizing it. Sometimes a new path is simply presented to you. And sometimes, you are thrust onto a path by unanticipated events that in retrospect are a blessing. The last scenario happened to me.

Several years ago, I survived a brutal period of domestic violence with increasing levels of mental and physical abuse, including almost dying in one incident where choking and a knife were involved. The incomprehensible, surreal effect that this has on anyone, especially on anyone who has no prior knowledge of the cycle of domestic violence (as is common), is hard to put into words. The terror, the constant anxiety, the self-doubt and threats from the abuser about telling someone — unless you’ve experienced it, which hopefully you have not and will not, it’s challenging to acutely understand it.

Having felt this first-hand, I decided to try to help a population of hurting people who did acutely know this horrific feeling: moms with kids. Statistics vary, but on average, studies suggest that on the low end, just over a quarter (28 percent) of homeless moms are victims of domestic violence. In Southern California, where I lived, it’s closer to 50 percent. And these are likely underreported figures. At some point, to save your own life and/or your children’s lives, the only choices become: he’s out, or you’re out. And so moms and kids become homeless.

I had already been working with Union Rescue Mission for several years after being stunned upon learning of the number of homeless people in L.A. when I moved there from Ohio. Seeing the women and kids there on Skid Row broke my heart, even though the kids smiled and laughed and played like kids do, and the moms were so appreciative of the safety and shelter and basics of living.

Hoping to help more long-term, I asked to design and teach a series of classes at URM about finding jobs, which went extremely well. One of the women (whom we’ll call Jane) who had been in the classes for a couple months twice a week approached me one day after class. The stories Jane shared then about her history literally brought tears to my eyes.

And then, Jane dramatically altered my life for the better.

“Thank you for showing me last week how to use Word and Excel,” she said. “I just wanted to tell you I got a job in Vegas and am moving there next week.”

Jane was smart and only needed confidence and a little information. But she gave me something monumental. To have contributed even a little to one woman being freed from the situation she was currently in made my heart sing.

From then on, I became increasing passionate about social good in many ways, including donating a car and my diamond wedding rings to Karz 4 Kids and Hope Gardens, respectively. (Hope Gardens is Union Rescue Mission’s transitional housing for moms and kids away from Skid Row, which opened a while after Jane moved away; I was a member of their Capital Campaign for several years and am a big fan.) While donating financially is certainly not the only way to help organizations, it felt extremely cathartic to me personally. Spreading awareness and hope via social media is another way that feels great, and anyone can do it anytime. Twitter has been a huge source of ongoing inspiration for me and millions of others.

This piece of this tale has written a happy ending for itself. What caused immeasurable pain led to equally immeasurable growth, empathy and gratitude for learning and being able to help others.

When life hands you a giant bushel of lemons, it makes plenty of lemonade to share along your path.

If you or someone you know is experiencing domestic violence, the National Domestic Violence Hotline can help: 1-800-799-7233 (SAFE) or NDVH.org. Not sure? This quiz can help: “Is this abuse?”

Activism , Battered Women , Domestic Abuse , Domestic Abuse Homeless Women , Domestic Abuse Victims , Domestic Violence Homeless Women , Domestic Violence Victims , Homeless Women Domestic Abuse , Homeless Women Domestic Violence , Violence , Impact New

Top 10 Creative Social Good Resources | TheTop10Blog.com

22 Jul

Top 10 Creative Social Good Resources | TheTop10Blog.com

http://www.thetop10blog.com/top-10-creative-social-good-resources/

In this latest installment of my Expert Series I am delighted to welcome Amy Neumann with her compilation of web sites which provide creative resources and tools to help you to get involved in helping others.

Amy, who may be better known to you on Twitter as @charityideas is a passionate advocate of using social media and technology for social good. She is also a lady who is prepared to but her beliefs into practice as one of the team tackling Mera Peak in the Himalayas in Nepal, in April 2012 in aid of charity.

If you would like to find out more about Amy you can find all the places where she blogs and her other social media connections at About.me.

Top 10 Creative Social Good Resources

A question anyone in the “social good” space is asked often, is “What are some of your favorite sites?” Well, there are oodles, which can make it a challenge to select a few choice ones for lists. However, below are a few favorites that might be new or unexpected, ranging across volunteering, fundraising, research, donating, pro-bono, mobile, and a couple very cool celebrity-backed ventures! All of them are excellent tools. Just click on the images to pay them a visit.
Philanthroper

The daily deals site for charity! Get introduced to a new cause every day and give $1 when you’re interested. Awareness plus micro-action! Making doing good an easy daily habit.

Sparked

An opportunity to micro-volunteer anytime, anywhere, online. Projects range from 2 minutes to 2 hours and include many fun, techie things like reviewing social media or translating documents. To learn all about Sparked please see my Huffington Post piece with @2morrowknight.

Crowdrise

Ed Norton’s baby, Crowdrise leverages crowdsourcing for social good fundraising. Any site that uses the mantra “If you don’t give back, no one will like you” is on the right track! Look for their fabulous IYDGBNOWLY T-shirts and set up a fundraising site for your favorite cause.

Kiva

Welcome to the world of micro-finance! Lend a global budding entrepreneur as little as $25 to provide an opportunity for sustainable business. Kiva supporters have already funded close to 600,000 businesses worldwide.

Catchafire

“What will your Butterfly Effect be?” Catchafire helps you use professional skills like marketing and PR on a pro-bono basis, growing your own professional contacts and helping social good organizations at the same time!

Give.Mobi

Let your favorite charity know about this resource, and check who’s here that you support. Since give.mobi’s mobile donation platform works on any smartphone or tablet, it’s simple to set up and use to give a real-time mobile donation (or pledge). Perfect for nonprofit events or to call out on radio or TV interviews due to its easy-to-remember name. Here’s @Lotay Yang’s Black Card Circle Foundation’s page.

KarmaGoat

Free your stuff, shop from friends, do some good! This works like Craigslist, with all proceeds going to charity. Got something too nice to just give away? Some electronics? A gift you’ll never use? Create some good Karma with it. It will get a new home and love, and a great cause will get a donation.

CharityNavigator

Along with GuideStar, this is a great site to research organizations. It’s similar to a Better Business Bureau, for charities.

SixDegrees

It really is a small world! A partnership between Kevin Bacon and Network for Good, Six Degrees helps you see what causes you have in common with friends and celebrities, and you can “pay it forward” with Good Cards that can be redeemed for charity donations.

VolunteerGuide

Self-directed Ideas and resources for volunteering for 15 minutes, a few hours, or on a volunteer vacation. Some easy 15-minute activities:

The moral of the story is – there are nearly unlimited ways to do good. These are a few easy, fun ones to get started with – how will you use them? Please let us know in the comments below!

Many thanks to Amy for her excellent and varied breakdown of many of the best online places to go to be able to offer your money, skills or time to those less fortunate than you.

Thank you for visiting The Top 10 Blog. If you like this post I hope you will share and if you would like to see more please Subscribe, Follow, Like and Add to your Circles using the buttons at the top of the sidebar.

About Amy Neumann:

Amy Neumann is a passionate advocate of using social media and technology for social good and is VP of Social Media Initiatives for Social Impact Consulting, a Los Angeles firm. http://www.facebook.com/SocialImpactConsultingLLC

For the past 17 years, she has been in executive internet and media sales, helping large corporations leverage media, marketing, and technology. After being an active advocate for causes in Los Angeles for 15 years, she recently relocated back to Cleveland, Ohio.

Amy is a social entrepreneur, developing several non-profit technology apps for use in the US and China to be released in the summer of 2011. Her affinity for Asian culture and history has led to studying Mandarin Chinese for several years as well as an interest in emerging philanthropy markets where technology can really boost donations and volunteerism.

A keen love of nature, adventure, and social media also inspired her to join 12 Twitter friends in a 3-week trek to the top of Mera Peak in the Himalayas in Nepal, April 2012 (which of course will be shared via social media).

Amy’s penchant for all things social media stems from seeing sites like Twitter and Facebook change to course of history, as well as help countless causes by galvanizing human passion.

*Image credit

Hand and Heart – Idea go / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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