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SME Cleveland’s Professional Development Day 2/12/13 – Marketing (w @CharityIdeas)

4 Feb

Exciting!  I’m looking forward to joining the Sales and Marketing Executives of Cleveland February 12 as a presenter for their Professional Development Day – Marketing.  Learn how to:

  • Fine tune your sales skills

  • Implement social media strategies

  • Develop relationship skills to improve your business

SME logo SME logo

Tuesday, February 12, 2013 * 8:00a.m. to 4:30p.m.
DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Cleveland Downtown -Lakeside
1111 Lakeside Avenue
Cleveland, Ohio 44114

R.S.V.P. online at www.smecleveland.com or 216-767-5951

For more details click here.

Speakers presenting:

Bob Sukys
Partner
The Partnering Group

“Using Brand ENRg to Bring Life to your Brand”

Scott Mowery
Cleveland Clinic

Search Engine Optimization

Amy Neumann
cleveland.com

Social Media for Sales and Marketing

Kristy Amy
Smart Business Network

Driving conversation through content

Hope to see you there!  R.S.V.P. online at www.smecleveland.com or 216-767-5951.  Thanks!

On “Luck” – Create Your Own

21 Sep

“I’ve found that luck is quite predictable. If you want more luck, take more chances. Be more active. Show up more often.”

~ Brian Tracy

One of the things I taught homeless women trying to break free from abuse and poverty was a simple idea a smart woman taught me many years before.

To make more money than average, you have to do one of two things:  Do what other people won’t do, or do what other people can’t do.

Which leads me to the story about luck.

When I was a newly-minted 21-year-old, I won a trip for President’s Club to Las Vegas with my then-employer.  In all my glorious, worldly prowess, it seemed a great idea when the VP Sales for our region of that Fortune 500 company asked me to play $20 blackjack tables with her.

Yay!”, I thought.  “She wants to hang out!”  *So cool.*

And it was…

For the roughly 20 minutes it took me to lose $360.  That’s a lot.  And it was a LOT A LOT after just graduating!

So after that momentous few minutes, I looked at her and said, “I think I’ll go over there.” LOL.  To which she knowingly replied, “Amy, you’re a good sport.  You’ll never have blind “luck”.  Doesn’t matter.  You have drive.  Make your own luck.”

In Vegas, that was a nary a victory.  In life, truer words were never spoken.  And I am so glad for that…because “luck” is unpredictable.  Being kind, useful, smart, helpful, and open to learning is something anyone can have.  And if you can do or will do what others can’t, you will always create your own luck.

Now go on, do something amazing… and create your own luck.

Catchafire Virtual – Now You Can Do ProBono Work From Anywhere!

7 Sep

Giving your skills for good in America will take a great leap forward this September as Catchafire activates virtual pro bono for the first time. Catchafire matches professionals who want to give their skills with social good organizations that need their help, making it easy for every professional to use their skills for good and for every social good organization to access and effectively use pro bono as a way to build capacity within their organization.

Until recently, only pro bono professionals based in the greater NYC area were able to take advantage of @Catchafire‘s pro bono opportunities. However, professionals from all over the United States will be able to give their skills for good, even if they are not in the same location as the social good organization they are helping.  A few key points on virtual pro bono at Catchafire:

•  Almost all Catchafire projects are suitable for virtual pro bono, and social good organizations will receive project applications from virtual professionals in the same way they do from local ones.

•  Social good organizations will now have more talent choices and a larger pool of professionals to help them address their needs.

•  Meetings will be conducted via videoconference or telephone, with both parties taking advantage of 21st century technology such as Skype, Gchat and Google Docs to work efficiently.

“The move to virtual pro bono is based on us now being at a stage in our lifecycle where we feel that we can provide our organizations and our professionals with just as good an experience virtually,  as we can in person,” said Catchafire CEO Rachael Chong. “We wanted to make sure that we had all the pieces in place to make a virtual project just as successful as a project where the professional and organization can meet face to face. While we still advocate local matches, we want to provide our organizations with as much choice as possible in terms of talent, and do not believe we should restrict them if they decide to choose a virtual professional instead of a locally based one.”

Ready to get involved? Register here!

Share Learn Grow! An Interview with Twitter’s Famed @CharityIdeas | TechCocktail.com by Samantha Strauss

22 Jul

Share Learn Grow! An Interview with Twitter’s Famed @CharityIdeas

http://techcocktail.com/interview-twitter-charityideas-2011-07#.Thxro-Ap-8U

Samantha Strauss July 12, 2011 – TechCocktail.com
Social Media Entrepreneurs Amy Neumann

Today’s post by Tech Cocktail contributor Samantha Strauss (@SFSam22) is the first of a collection of interviews with some heavy-weight social media industry personalities with a goal to highlight the entrepreneur in all of us.

Are you on Twitter? If you’re reading Tech Cocktail, we’ll assume you are. Since you’re on Twitter we’ll also assume that you may have heard of and/or be one of the over 32,000 people who follows @CharityIdeas, aka Amy Neumann. As one of The Huffington Post’s Top 16 People on Twitter Who Inspire the World and Bit Rebels’ Twitter’s Top 75 Bad Ass Women, Amy is known by her followers as a constant source of engaging philanthropic content and enlightening tweets.

What her followers and the world might not know is that while Amy is a “Twitter celebrity,” she’s also an entrepreneur. After years in the corporate world working for companies such as AT&T and Yahoo in various marketing capacities, Amy launched the consulting firm Good Plus Tech in April of this year. Good Plus Tech, merged Amy’s two passions, technology and volunteering.

“Good Plus Tech does just what the name says,” Amy said. “Social good plus technology. We focus on cause marketing and social good branding for nonprofits and corporations, with an emphasis on social media….My long-term goal is to impact the global level of volunteering and donating, focusing on emerging philanthropy markets.”

Recently we had a chance to talk with Amy about how she got started and what her thoughts on entrepreneurship, social media (specifically Twitter), leadership and charity are. Here is what Amy had to say:

Amy Neumann, Founder of Good Plus Tech and @CharityIdeas on Twitter

TC: What are the key attributes of a successful entrepreneur?

Amy: I’d answer this with an adage we’ve heard a million times but is so true: we are all entrepreneurs. We sell our ideas to clients, coworkers, board members, spouses, friends, audiences….Even if you aren’t running your own company, you’re still running your life, and you’re always in charge. No matter what, we all control how we treat people and ourselves.

TC: Is there a guiding principle that you wish you knew when you started that you know now?

Amy: “Just Do It”! Take risks. If you’re wrong, you learn faster than any other way possible. And the more often you try new things, the faster you find the ones you love and are meant to do.

TC: What would you say to a budding entrepreneur?

Amy: Network with positive, smart, giving people. Ask people who are where you want to be how they did it. Find a great mentor or two or three. Most successful people got that way by being honest, friendly, hard-working, and helpful and are happy to share ideas and insight.

TC: Why is social media important to you?

Amy: I’m a wildly curious person and lover of people, so social media is the perfect way to instantly connect with fascinating people and ideas all over the world. And without sites like Twitter to connect people with similar passions, how else would we happen upon them? Love it.

TC: What’s your key to building a great following on Twitter?

Amy: Keep in mind that Twitter is IRL – real people behind avatars (mostly). So the things that work well in person, adjusted to social media format, work well. Share interesting and useful things. Be helpful. Listen. Respond. Be friendly and courteous. Thank people. Introduce people you think would like each other. And be positive.

TC: Do you thank every person that RTs you? Why or Why not?

Amy: Whenever possible, I try to thank people, and I RT tons of interesting links and quotes as well. Share the wealth, I say! After awhile it can be hard to thank everyone all the time, but I do read and appreciate every tweet even if I don’t send a thanks or RT right away.

TC: What’s your Twitter mantra?

Amy: Share, learn, grow!

TC: Why is Charity important to you?

Amy: Helping others makes both sides happy. It’s a fundamental love of mine. Not everything is perfect for anyone all the time, so helping one another when it’s needed is important. It really does help the giver as much as the recipient.

TC: How do you recommend people include charity in their life? Should it be a daily goal? Weekly goal to help someone at least once?

Amy: Some easy ones first! Smile more. Be friendly to strangers. Give people the benefit of the doubt. And of course, there are great sites online for raising money, virtual volunteering, and spreading awareness, in addition to volunteering in person. Twitter and Facebook are immensely helpful for spreading awareness, so just talking about your favorite cause is helpful.

TC: Can you name a person who has had a tremendous impact on you as a leader? Maybe someone who has been a mentor to you? How did this person impact your life?

Amy: My parents instilled a love of helping in me, and my father’s an entrepreneur. I have met countless people who’ve had an influence by being optimistic, unstoppable world-changers. And I adored Bill Gates and Warren Buffett long before they became the world’s largest philanthropists and created the Giving Challenge, which makes me admire them even more.

And For Some Extra Fun…

TC: If you could have any superpower what would it be?

Amy: Teleportation! I love, love, love traveling. The faster, the better!

TC: If you could meet anyone in the world (dead or alive) who would it be and why?

Amy: Leonardo Da Vinci. He was fascinated by and insatiably curious about life, which led to his discovery of and creating new things across art, science, writing, math…you name it.

TC: What’s your favorite motivational quote/saying?

Amy: “I’m always doing things I can’t do. That’s how I get to do them.” ~ Pablo Picasso

5 Ways Volunteering Can Help You Get a Job

8 Sep

Originally published on Yahoo HotJobs: http://hotjobs.yahoo.com/career-articles-5_ways_volunteering_can_help_you_get_a_job-1124

5 Ways Volunteering Can Help You Get a Job

by Amy Neumann, for Yahoo! HotJobs

There are a lot of obvious benefits to volunteering for your favorite charity — a sense of accomplishment, giving back to others, gaining perspective, and meeting new people. You can also find business benefits, and ways your efforts can help land you your dream job.

Develop New Skills

Volunteering can be a positive way to get training in areas your current or past jobs didn’t provide. If you need some additional experience for a particular job or promotion, there are many options. For example:

  • Project management — organizing events or fundraising efforts
  • Sales skills — contacting people for donations or recruiting volunteers
  • Managing a team — many projects require a group effort, and a leader to coordinate it

VolunteerMatch.org offers free webinars on “How to be a great volunteer” to get you started.

Meet New Networking Contacts

You never know who you’ll meet doing charity work. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 42.8% of all volunteers in 2009 had a bachelor’s degree or higher, while the U.S. Census 2007 put the national average of degree holders at 25.6%. So your chances of meeting professionals in the volunteer pool are good. If you choose a volunteer role related to your target job, you might run into people with similar interests or that have jobs similar to the one you want.

Impress Employers With Your Ambition

Many companies have a strong social responsibility core, and showing your charitable side displays a good cultural fit.

Tony Blake, staffing director at DaVita, a Fortune 500 kidney dialysis provider, notes that candidates who volunteer stand out in a positive way. “As our CEO Kent Thiry says, ‘We’re a community first and a corporation second.’ We value the passion and involvement with community. It adds depth to a candidate’s resume and experience, and it gets noticed.”

Fill in Employment Gaps, Add Experience

Volunteer experience is also professional experience. List the organization and dates, and instead of using the title “volunteer,” use your responsibilities as a title — “project coordinator” or “instructor.” Mention your accomplishments, results, or awards like any other job, without being misleading.

Using your time to gain new skills and help your community — either while looking for employment or while working — highlights your willingness to jump in, learn new things, and do more.

Get That Extra Spring in Your Step

Giving back can be an energizing boost to your self-worth and confidence. Volunteers are the backbone of any nonprofit. By helping others, you’ll get that fulfilling “I made the world a little better” feeling in return.

“Without our 14,000 volunteers putting in 45,000 hours of service each year, we could only serve a tiny fraction of the 1.2 million meals we serve a year,” says Andy Bales, CEO of Union Rescue Mission in Los Angeles. “There are opportunities to mentor, tutor, plan events and activities, work in the back office, and multiple other options. Volunteers really do impact peoples’ lives.”

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